Homosexuality in the Black Community

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i want 5 paragraphs:

1st paragraph: introduction: The opening statement, the supporting sentences, and the thesis.   First paragraph of the body:
The first paragraph of the body should contain the strongest argument, most significant example, cleverest illustration, or an obvious beginning point. The first sentence of this paragraph should include the “reverse hook” which ties in with the transitional hook at the end of the introductory paragraph. The topic for this paragraph should be in the first or second sentence. This topic should relate to the thesis statement in the introductory paragraph. The last sentence In this paragraph, you should include a transitional hook to tie into the   Second paragraph of the body:
The second paragraph of the body should contain the second strongest argument, second most significant example, second cleverest illustration, or an obvious follow up the first paragraph in the body. The first sentence of this paragraph should include the reverse hook which ties in with the transitional hook at the end of the first paragraph of the body. The topic for this paragraph should be in the first or second sentence. This topic should relate to the thesis statement in the introductory paragraph. The last sentence in this paragraph should include a transitional hook to tie into the third paragraph of the body.

Third paragraph of the body:
The third paragraph of the body should contain the weakest argument, weakest example, weakest illustration, or an obvious follow up to the second paragraph in the body. The first sentence of this paragraph should include the reverse hook which ties in with the transitional hook at the end of the second paragraph. The topic for this paragraph should be in the first or second sentence. This topic should relate to the thesis statement in the introductory paragraph. The last sentence in this paragraph should include a transitional concluding hook that signals the reader that this is the final major point being made in this paper. This hook also leads into the last, or concluding, paragraph.

Conclusion:

Concluding paragraph:
#This paragraph should include the following:

-An allusion to the pattern used in the introductory paragraph,
-a restatement of the thesis statement, using some of the original language or language that “echoes” the original language. (The restatement, however, must not be a duplicate thesis statement.)
-a summary of the three main points from the body of the paper.
-a final statement that gives the reader signals that the discussion has come to an end. (This final statement may be a “call to action” in a persuasive paper.)

Answer

Name of Student:

Name of Professor:

English Paper

21 November 2016.

Homosexuality in the Black Community

It is common to hear of some activists arguing for and others against homosexuals and people of other sexual orientations. Over the years, this issue has grown from one that was rarely discussed, to a major talking point in all social spheres. Besides, many laws have been passed that tough gender transitions and ways of addressing issues relating to issues affecting homosexuals. This analysis will specifically look into homophobia in the black community and how it has been impacted by culture and religion. Ethnicity and history are major factors that have contributed to the development of the topic. Both have highly contributed to reactions and perceptions towards homosexuality within the black community.

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Homophobia is the discrimination against and hostility towards people who identify with or belong to the lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender community (LGBT). In such situations, members of these sexual orientations rely strongly on their respective ethnic and racial memberships for support. However, within the black community, they are widely regarded as weak and defective members of society. Research suggests within the LGBT community, blacks faces the highest levels of homophobia and rejection (Goldberg 67). For this reason, activist groups have endeavored to cover as much ground as they can in terms of promoting the rights of this social group within the community. It is now becoming increasingly obvious that success in the fight against homophobia largely depends on religious and cultural factors. It has become extremely difficult to separate homophobia from the complex interaction between culture and religious practices.

Many members of the black community strongly identify with religiosity and the role of Christianity in shaping one’s moral values. This practice dates back to the era of colonization and slavery in Africa. Initially, for Africans, religious practices were primarily based on traditional gods and deities. During exploration, merchants and missionaries introduced Christianity into most of the African communities. Following the onset of slave trade, massive populations were captured and taken to foreign lands in the Americas (Mallon 167). Here, they found comfort in their religion and developed distinct black churches and the now- popular Negro spiritual songs. This black church was strengthened amidst slavery, oppression, racism and Jim Crow laws. All along, the characteristics of strength, macho-like personality, bravery, eloquence and confidence were highly elevated. For this reason that gay men are widely perceived as weak, and it is for this reason that they attract ridicule from their fellow community members. They are perceived as weak, impotent and even unable to take care of their community. Interestingly, perception is most prevalent among fellow men who have put masculinity and manliness on a high pedestal. To deal with homosexual members of the family, most black people initially adopt a silent approach or take up a religious route (Mumford 68). In regard to the silent approach, family members tend to choose not to openly address the matter. However, in many situations, the homosexual member may be treated harshly. Alternatively, many families turn to the church in the pursuit of a form of homosexual exorcism. This method usually leads to loss of dignity and respect of the homosexual individual who is further demonized and excluded if the ‘ritual’ fails bring about the desired outcomes (Mumford 121).

The sociological effects of homophobia in the black community are also evident even in media portrayals. Popular shows that have depicted black homosexual characters and relationships tend to receive severe backlash from antigay groups. Consequently, the process of coming out and expressing one’s sexual orientation to family members has become exceedingly difficult for the black community (Patrick 97). In most cases, a black homosexual who is rejected is compelled to denounce his/her community and religion. This is an extremely difficult situation it leaves them without an immediate social support group. Therefore, it is extremely important that activists devise ways of dealing with LGBT rights of the black community.

To conclude, there is an inseparable link between black community’s cultural practices, socialization and religious practices when it comes to attitudes towards homosexuality. Strategies for promoting LGBT rights in this community should encompass ways of addressing these factors in an integrated manner. They should focus on the existing structures of ethnicity, culture, history and religion. In this context, the achievement of freedom for the LGBT group greatly relies on finding a functional balance between all the aforementioned structures. It is only through this approach that the black community can emerge from the shackles of discrimination against its homosexual members.

Works Cited

Goldberg, Abbie. Gay Dads: Transitions to Adoptive Fatherhood. New York: New York University Press, 2012. Print.

Mallon, Gerald. Gay Men Choosing Parenthood. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004. Print.

Mumford, Kevin. Not Straight, Not White: Black Gay Men from the March on Washington to the AIDS Crisis. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2016. Print.

Patrick, Eric. Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2012. Print.

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